Category Archives: Pathways to Vitality

Pathways to Vitality: Taxability and Gifts

pathways to vitalityA new blog post has been published.

Taxability and Gifts

From time to time, you may have questions regarding the taxability of gifts you give or your congregation receives. With April 15 upon us, this may be a timely topic. Here is a Pop Quiz to test your knowledge. Good luck!


Past Posts

Pathways’ Pilot Parishes Announced

Bishop Catherine Waynick and Canon to the Ordinary, Bruce Gray, recently announced the appointment of Good Samaritan (Brownsburg), St. Alban’s (Indianapolis), St. John’s (Speedway) and Trinity (Lawrenceburg) as the Pathways to Vitality Pilot Parishes.

The goal of the Pathways’ Pilot Parish initiative is to assist these congregations in achieving enhanced sustainability by identifying their unique ministries, building vital congregational teams and developing practical financial and administrative skills.

Funded by Lilly Endowment Inc., representatives from the Pilot Parishes will have an immersive learning experience consisting of an opening retreat, a series of workshops and small group meetings over the course of 18 months starting this summer.
“This peer-learning model is based upon action and reflection providing participants with the opportunity to intentionally integrate lessons into their congregational lives,” according to Rev. Dr. Carol Pinkham Oak, Pathways Curricula Consultant.

The central-Indiana Pilot Parishes also will host a curate residency program for Diocesan postulant, Erin Hougland, according to Canon Gray. “This residency program will provide Erin with priestly formation and leadership opportunities giving her the confidence and skills necessary for future parish ministry.”

According to Pathways Program Director, Melissa Hickman, the lessons learned from the work of the Pilot Parishes may be adapted and enhanced for other congregations in the future. “We believe the experiences of these parishes will help the Diocese create more transformative programming that supports sustainability, vitality, and innovation in our congregations and in our diocese.”

Diocese Names Pathways to Vitality Priest

Erin Hougland has been called as the Pathways Priest for the Diocese of Indianapolis. Erin is a seminarian in the Diocese of Indianapolis. We are very excited to have her joining the Pathways project. She begins her full-time ministry on June 1.

The Pathways priest will serve three congregations for eight months each, helping them learn and apply the concepts and practices taught in the first year of the Pathways Priest and Congregations program.

Applications to be one of those congregations are available through the diocesan and Pathways websites, or by contacting Canon Bruce Gray.

Erin brings both achievements and skills to the position. Her experiences in the non-profit world as well as in church ministries have prepared her well for the demands that will be placed on the Pathways Priest. She has a track record of accomplishments working with volunteers, as well as experiences in leading changes in complex organizations. She also has led training efforts and done curriculum development work, which will be part of the ministry of the Pathways priest.

Melissa Hickman, Canon Debra Kissinger, and Canon Bruce Gray did extensive recruiting for the position within the Episcopal Church. Each seminary was contacted by email with a follow-up phone conversation requesting applicants for the position. The position was posted with the Office for Transitional Ministry, presented by Debra at Transitional Ministry conferences, advertised by the Episcopal Church Foundation in their work with senior seminarians, and informal networks were utilized as well. From those efforts, we had four qualified finalists who were interviewed by Bruce.

If you have any questions about the Pathways project, please contact Canon Bruce Gray.

Pathways to Vitality

1460661160Money Matters In Healthy Congregations

Studies conducted by Lilly Endowment Inc. and others show there is a direct relationship between the personal financial health of a priest and the overall vitality of his or her congregation. If a priest struggles with debilitating financial stress, ministerial excellence, leadership and decisions are compromised in the congregation. Everyone suffers.

Pathways to Vitality, a financial literacy initiative of the Episcopal Diocese of Indianapolis, is a three-year program funded by Lilly Endowment designed for clergy and lay leaders to facilitate well-informed and honest conversations about money.

The initiative has three goals:

  • To create a culture of transparency regarding clergy and parish finances in our congregations through financial literacy education.
  • To enhance ministerial innovation, vitality and sustainability in our congregations.
  • To implement a Ministerial Excellence Fund to provide financial support to clergy, seminarians and their families to enhance their financial wellbeing.

Ultimately, we hope to raise the “veil of silence” cloaking clergy and parish finances so we can authentically share in the generosity of God.


Posts on Indydio.org


Pathways to Vitality: Taxability and Gifts

pathways to vitality
A new blog post has been published. Taxability and Gifts From time to time, you may have questions regarding the taxability of gifts you give or your congregation receives. With April 15 upon us, this may be a timely topic. Here is a Pop Quiz to test your knowledge. Good luck! Past Posts

Pathways’ Pilot Parishes Announced

Pathways’ Pilot Parishes Announced
Bishop Catherine Waynick and Canon to the Ordinary, Bruce Gray, recently announced the appointment of Good Samaritan (Brownsburg), St. Alban’s (Indianapolis), St. John’s (Speedway) and Trinity (Lawrenceburg) as the Pathways to Vitality Pilot Parishes. The goal of the Pathways’ Pilot Parish initiative is to assist these congregations in achieving enhanced sustainability by identifying their unique ministries, building vital congregational teams and developing practical financial and administrative skills. Funded by Lilly Endowment Inc., representatives from the ...
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Diocese Names Pathways to Vitality Priest

Diocese Names Pathways to Vitality Priest
Erin Hougland has been called as the Pathways Priest for the Diocese of Indianapolis. Erin is a seminarian in the Diocese of Indianapolis. We are very excited to have her joining the Pathways project. She begins her full-time ministry on June 1. The Pathways priest will serve three congregations for eight months each, helping them learn and apply the concepts and practices taught in the first year of the Pathways Priest and Congregations program. Applications ...
Read More

Journey to Financial Vitality Blog

pathways to vitality
Pathways to Vitality is a financial literacy initiative of our diocese. It strengthens congregations by supporting clergy and lay leaders who serve them. Both clergy and lay leaders are indispensable in leading vital congregations positively impacting families, neighborhoods, communities... and the world. Now, they have this blog!   ...
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Diocesan Pathways to Vitality Conference Explores Financial Integrity

Diocesan Pathways to Vitality Conference Explores Financial Integrity
Comedian Peter Dunn and the Rev. Rick Foss, a former ELCA Lutheran bishop of Eastern North Dakota, spoke bluntly—as well as with humor—about financial integrity in families and congregations when they opened the Pathways to Vitality conference Saturday, April 16. The two main speakers identified key issues about honesty and money, and entertained about 200 lay and clergy leaders representing all the diocese’s congregations at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Peter Dunn (also known as ...
Read More

Diocesan Pathways to Vitality Conference Explores Financial Integrity

Comedian Peter Dunn and the Rev. Rick Foss, a former ELCA Lutheran bishop of Eastern North Dakota, spoke bluntly—as well as with humor—about financial integrity in families and congregations when they opened the Pathways to Vitality conference Saturday, April 16.

The two main speakers identified key issues about honesty and money, and entertained about 200 lay and clergy leaders representing all the diocese’s congregations at the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Peter Dunn (also known as Pete the Planner) revealed that financial wellness begins at home and identified behavior—not money—as the best way to talk about budget health.

“Crossed fingers are the No. 1 financial strategy in America, but hope is an awful planning strategy,” Dunn said. Literacy and wellness are essential components of sound money practices, and knowing how to use your financial products is at the root.

Dunn’s humorous example about knowing the details of your financial life versus knowing how to behave with your money is that 91 percent of Americans check their checking account balance at work.

“At the heart of this problem is ‘presenteeism’. This is a loss of productivity (that is very serious), when your mind is somewhere else,” he said.

Another hard reality of Americans’ financial behavior is that 11 percent of workers have garnishments for their debts, and too many workers “push the raise envelope”—because they don’t live under their means, they spend the difference between their old wages and new wages, instead of saving that money.

The No. 1 reason to spend beneath your means, Dunn said, is to retire. He spoke of a three-legged stool of financial wellness in retirement being savings, social security and expenses.

He pointed out that eliminating expenses—living beneath your means—is an important now behavior that impacts how you can live later in retirement.

On the subject of behavior, Dunn pointed to his own household. When he was a newlywed “our first household budget meeting was about a month after we were married.” His wife noted that he ate about 20 meals at Panera restaurant the previous month and used his debit card. “Yes, that’s true, I said” and he promised to never do that again.

He spun this story into his philosophy about how Americans spend money:

A disconnect exists between spending behaviors and sources of money, he said. In American households “the average number of expenditures per week is about 22” for daily necessities and should be from 10 to 14 a week. “If chips are one of your transactions, you’re in trouble.”

And finally, Dunn said that the goal of working to retirement with enough money to live on is being threatened by another dangerous behavior—the PLUS Loan (college loans taken out by parents for their children). “This will be the headline you see for the next 60 months.”

Student debt was a main topic of the Rev. Foss, who has been hired by the Indianapolis-based Lilly Endowment to coordinate programs within the Endowment’s national initiative to address economic challenges facing pastoral leaders.

The Rev. Foss drew a picture of student loan debt that is very serious, noting that effective leadership is impossible among those recently ordained clergy with very high debt.  High debt pre-occupies clergy and keeps them from focusing on their leadership in the parish.

“Vitality has nothing to do with size, but there were healthy and unhealthy congregations” when he was a Lutheran bishop.  He noted that some pastors in his congregations had personal financial difficulties that made them unable to lead because they were focused on their own problems.

He said that clergy as a group are motivated to help others, and have high integrity, but they have poor financial skills and savvy when they feel like they should be on top of it “and feel like I can’t lead or help myself, and are ashamed”.

Previously in the program, Canon Bruce Gray noted that 50 percent of clergy have student loan debt when they leave seminary.

Many newly-ordained clergy leave the ministry after five years if they have $30,000 or more in student debt, Gray said. Canon Gray said that in today’s church a third of clergy can’t afford to tithe, and this brings shame and sorrow that they can’t talk about with parish leadership.

Clergy financial wellbeing equals vital congregations, so authentic communications about possibilities become the focus of congregations, he said. The goal is “to lift the veil of silence surrounding money so we can all share in the generosity of God.”

The Pathways to Vitality conference was made possible by a grant from Lilly Endowment’s National Initiative to Address Economic Challenges Facing Pastoral Leaders. The $798,500 grant will fund a variety of new and existing financial literacy programs in the diocese designed to enhance ministerial innovation, vitality and sustainability in our congregations.

The Diocese of Indianapolis will

  • enhance existing financial literacy programs and services for clergy and lay leaders;
  • enhance congregational innovation, vitality and sustainability; and
  • establish the ministerial excellence fund to provide financial support to clergy.

A fourth component has established a $50,000 budget to support the relationship building work of the new bishop and successfully launch the new Episcopate in 2017.